CSNPC Schedule

2013 Central South Native Plant Conference
Friday and Saturday, November 1 and 2


 

Pre-Conference Master Design Class: October 31

8:30 - 4:30 p.m. - Art, Ecology and the Wild Garden - C. Colston Burrell, Principal, Native Landscape Design and Restoration; Lecturer, Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Virginia. Your garden is a community of plants and animals related to the neighborhood and the region. This workshop explores ecological design principles in that context to create gardens of the highest artistic merit. Home landscapes should be designed to minimize environmental impact, maximize ecological function, enhance wildlife value and accommodate human needs without sacrificing beauty. Topics covered will include design inspiration from nature, soil/plant relationships, plant selection and design examples.

 

2013 Schedule

 

Day One: Friday, November 1
Day Two: Saturday, November 2
  • 7 - 8 a.m. - Early Morning Birding - Helena Uber-Wamble, Education Manager, Birmingham Audubon Society
  • 7:45 - 8:30 a.m. - Registration/Coffee
  • 8:30 - 8:45 a.m. - Welcome/Announcements - Fred Spicer, Executive Director, Birmingham Botanical Gardens

 

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  • 7 - 8 a.m. - Early Morning Birding - Greg Harber, Chairman, Audubon Teaches Nature Committee, Birmingham Audubon Society
  • 7:45 - 8:30 a.m. - Registration/Coffee
  • 8:30 - 8:45 a.m. - Annoucements and a Tribute to Louise G. "Weesie" Smith - Fred Spicer, Executive Director, Birmingham Botanical Gardens, John Manion, Kaul Wildflower Garden Curator, Birmingham Botanical Gardens & Rebecca Cohn, Owner, CohnFlowers

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Day One Plenary: Linn-Henley Lecture Hall
Day Two Plenary: Strange Auditorium
  • 8:45 - 9:45 a.m. - Southeastern Forests Through Time: the 360 Million Year History of Plant Communities in the Southeast - Jim Lacefield, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Biology and Earth Sciences (retired), University of North Alabama. Southeastern plant communities today result from dynamic interplay between the geologic evolution of the region's landscapes and climate, and the ongoing evolution of plant life. Origins of this flora can be traced back hundreds of millions of years; major steps in its development are well-documented in the fossil record found across Alabama and adjacent regions.
  • 9:45 - 10 a.m. - BREAK
  • 10 - 11 a.m. - Longleaf: Far as the Eye Can See - John C. Hall, Ph.D., Curator of the Black Belt Museum, University of West Alabama. Echoing "Longleaf: Far as the Eye Can See," his recently co-authored book, Hall presents a tribute to the remarkable longleaf pine ecosystem, examining its range, appearance, diversity and cultural connections to the life and economy of our region. From turpentine manufacturing and pitch making, to timbering and the depression-era conversation crisis, human exploitation has made it one of America's most endangered ecosystems.
  • 11 - Noon - The Native Plant Movement in North America - C. Colston Burrell, Principal, Native Landscape Design and Restoration; Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Virginia. The late 19th Century set the stage for a national love affair with native plants. Victorian passion for the outdoors gave birth to the field guide. The environmental movement caused the modern native plant nursery to blossom. Today, native plants are integral to horticulture and design in America, while conerns about invasive exotic species, habitat destruction, global warming and xenophobia are more relevant than ever.
  • Noon - 1 p.m. - LUNCH

 

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  • 8:45 - 9:45 a.m. - Humans and the Forest Through and Evolutionary Lens - David G. Haskell, Ph.D., Sewanee: The University of the South. Using examples from his book, "The Forest Unseen," Haskell will discuss how an understanding of the past can help us see the forst in richer ways and how an evolutionary view of life might promote more principled relationships with other species, grounding us with an ethic of belonging.
  • 9:45 - 10 a.m. - BREAK
  • 10 - 11 a.m. - The Glossy Age of Botany: Disassembling the Green Blob - Chris Martine, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Biology Department, Bucknell University. Botanical awareness is in precipitous decline and universities have cut back botany programs. The public, instead of recognizing diverse and beautiful plants, sees only nondescript green blobs separate from their own day-to-day experiences. Changing this paradigm is possible, but traditional botanical education requires a reboot. Ideally, awareness starts in our own "backyards," where connections between humans and plants and ecosystems close at hand can be reestablished.
  • 11 - Noon - Southeastern Plant Conservation: Challenges, Hopes and Light on the Horizon - Bob Boyd, Ph.D., Professor, Biological Sciences, Auburn University. Our high plant diversity in the Southeast faces various conservation challenges. Boyd will describe some of these challenges and will point to developments by individuals, groups, organizations and government agencies that show how progress is being made to protect our plant biodiversity. Exciting projects of the Alabama Plant Conservation Alliance will be profiled to ilustrate the bright light on the horizon.
  • Noon - 1 p.m. - LUNCH

 

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Day One Concurrents:

Room Locations Will Be Posted at the Conference

Day Two Concurrents:

Room Locations Will Be Posted at the Conference

  • 1 - 1:50 p.m. - Native Plants in Your Garden: Lessons From Nature and Culture - C. Colston Burrell, Principal, Native Landscape Design and Restoration; Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Virginia. When we plant a native floodplain species in an upland situation, are we gardening ecologically? Are cultivars native? These and other questions are explored as Burrell, from an ecological perspective, examines the current popularity of landscaping with native plants. This lecture focuses on techniques for working with seasonal rhythms, structure and dynamics of native plant communities.
  • 1 - 1:50 p.m. - Bibb County Glades: Alabama's Lost Botanical World - Tom Diggs, Ph.D., Department of Biology, University of Alabama. Step back 10,000 years into Alabama's natural history with Diggs, and learn about the rare, unusual and endangered plants of this special habitat. Eight species new to science were discovered there relatively recently, including several endemics. How these plants evolved and adapted to this unique place is a fascinating story.
  • 1 - 1:50 p.m. - Nature Inspired: Biomimicry and its Application in the Constructed Landscape - Arnie Rutkis, Principal, Stoneshovel Landscape. Nature does it best! After examining various natural landscapes, including glades, wetlands and meadows, Rutkis will illustrate their designed equivalents in the urban/suburban matrix of our cities, towns and countrysides. Biomimicry takes cues from nature and can help us create the gardens we desire.

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  • 2 - 2:50 p.m. - SoutheasternFlora.com: A Practical Resource for Native Plant Identification - John Gwaltney, CEO, Forestry Suppliers, Inc. Southeastern Flora is an online resource to assist users in identifying native or naturalized wildflowers commonly found in the southeast. Currently there are nearly 1,600 species listed on this site and over 30,000 pictures to facilitate easy identification without knowing how to interpret a plant identification key.
  • 2 - 2:50 p.m. - Tutwiler's Spleenwort: Alabama's Rare Botanical Treasure - Hunter McBrayer, Plant Diagnostic Lab Technician, Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Join McBrayer on a historical journey that uncovers the fascinating story of one of the world's rarest plants, beginning in a hidden glen and extending to modern research. From 19th Century discovery to present-day conservation efforts, you'll learn about the continuing work being done to perpetuate this species' survival.
  • 2 - 2:50 p.m. - A Glimpse Into the History of Plant Cultivation - Michelle Reynolds, Environmental Educator, Artist, Writer. Reynolds will offer a whirlwind look at the history of plant cultivation beginning with early humans. She will discuss the evolution of agriculture and gardens, the human need to exert power over nature and the rise and fall of those relationships. This will all lead to her articulating the case for living harmoniously.

_____________________________

  • 3 - 3:50 p.m. - Native Plants in Your Garden: Lessons From Nature and Culture - C. Colston Burrell, Principal, Native Landscape Design and Restoration; Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Virginia. When we plant a native floodplain species in an upland situation, are we gardening ecologically? Are cultivars native? These and other questions are explored as Burrell, from an ecological perspective, examines the current popularity of landscaping with native plants. This lecture focuses on techniques for working with seasonal rhythms, structure and dynamics of native plant communities.
  • 3 - 3:50 p.m. - Bibb County Glades: Alabama's Lost Botanical World - Tom Diggs, Ph.D., Department of Biology, University of Alabama. Step back 10,000 years into Alabama's natural history with Diggs, and learn about the rare, unusual and endangered plants of this special habitat. Eight species new to science were discovered there relatively recently, including several endemics. How these plants evolved and adapted to this unique place is a fascinating story.
  • 3 - 3:50 p.m. - Nature Inspired: Biomimicry and its Application in the Constructed Landscape - Arnie Rutkis, Principal, Stoneshovel Landscape. Nature does it best! After examining various natural landscapes, including glades, wetlands and meadows, Rutkis will illustrate their designed equivalents in the urban/suburban matrix of our cities, towns and countrysides. Biomimicry takes cues from nature and can help us create the gardens we desire.

_____________________________

  • 4 - 4:50 p.m. - Ferns: From Relics to Curiosities to Appreciated Anew - Dan Jones, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biology, UAB. Captivating and integral parts of the world's flora, ferns inhabit quiet woodland habitats but also those impacted by distrubances. Utilizing an array of reproductive approaches that include mystifying spores and elusive gametophytes, some have endured for many millions of years, others are recent arrivals. From architectural beauties to weedy nuisances, Jones discusses fern structure, diversity and ecology, highlighting Southeastern natives.
  • 4 - 4:50 p.m. - Alabama Birds: Their Habitats and Our Common Future - Greg Harber, Chairman, Audubon Teaches Nature Committee, Birmingham Audubon Society. Over 400 species of birds have been documented in Alabama, due in large part to habitat diversity. While some familiar species, such as northern cardinal and northern mockingbird, are habitat generalists, others are much more limited in distribution. As native habitats change or are lost, the suite of bird life responds accordingly, having important ramifications for the future.
  • 4 - 4:50 p.m. - Bees, Native Plants and History - Sallie Lee, Urban Region Agent, Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Historically, bees (both native and non-native) have been responsible for providing food and a natural sweetener for our tables. Now, most bee populations are in decline. This presentation will address activities that have upset the delicate natural balance of plant and pollinator, how can we look back to find answers and what can we do to improve future outcomes.

 

_____________________________

  • 1 - 1:50 p.m. - Alabama Birds: Their Habitats and Our Common Future - Greg Harber, Chairman, Audubon Teaches Nature Committee, Birmingham Audubon Society. Over 400 species of birds have been documented in Alabama, due in large part to habitat diversity. While some familiar species, such as northern cardinal and northern mockingbird, are habitat generalists, others are much more limited in distribution. As native habitats change or are lost, the suite of bird life responds accordingly, having important ramifications for the future.
  • 1 - 1:50 p.m. - A Glimpse Into the History of Plant Cultivation - Michelle Reynolds, Environmental Educator, Artist, Writer. Reynolds will offer a whirlwind look at the history of plant cultivation beginning with early humans. She will discuss the evolution of agriculture and gardens, the human need to exert power over nature and the rise and fall of those relationships. This will all lead to her articulating the case for living harmoniously.
  • 1 - 1:50 p.m. - Good Things From the South - Fred Spicer, Executive Director, Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Many gardeners use the term "native" broadly. Northern gardens would be much less diverse and beautiful if designers didn't embrace southeastern native plants as their own. In this presentation, you'll see and learn more about the southern origins of numerous species (and cultivars) of trees and shrubs whose nativity is misunderstood.

_____________________________

  • 2 - 2:50 p.m. - Native Trees in Our Cultural Landscapes - Henry Hughes - Director of Education, Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Native trees, many over 200 years old, are the natural architecture of our neighborhoods and parks. As they are lost, the appearance of the landscape changes, often permanently. This presentation will address the historic, cultural and ecological importance of native trees in the urban landscape, with a plea for their protection and regeneration.
  • 2 - 2:50 p.m. - Ferns: From Relics to Curiosities to Appreciated Anew - Dan Jones, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biology, UAB. Captivating and integral parts of the world's flora, ferns inhabit quiet woodland habitats but also those impacted by distrubances. Utilizing an array of reproductive approaches that include mystifying spores and elusive gametophytes, some have endured for many millions of years, others are recent arrivals. From architectural beauties to weedy nuisances, Jones discusses fern structure, diversity and ecology, highlighting Southeastern natives.
  • 2 - 2:50 p.m. - Ethnobotany: Plants, People, Purpose - Drew Monthie, Adjunct Professor, Ecology and Ethnobotany, SUNY Empire State College. This presentation explores a cross-section of the development of plant use from Old World cutures to the amazing diaspora of plants that accompanied the European colonization of the globe. Colonization led to an amazing exchange of ethnobotanical knowledge between diverse groups of indigenous and transplanted cultures. This exchange was immediate and has influenced modern cultures since.

_____________________________

  • 3 - 3:50 p.m. - Native Trees in Our Cultural Landscapes - Henry Hughes - Director of Education, Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Native trees, many over 200 years old, are the natural architecture of our neighborhoods and parks. As they are lost, the appearance of the landscape changes, often permanently. This presentation will address the historic, cultural and ecological importance of native trees in the urban landscape, with a plea for their protection and regeneration.
  • 3 - 3:50 p.m. - Tutwiler's Spleenwort: Alabama's Rare Botanical Treasure - Hunter McBrayer, Plant Diagnostic Lab Technician, Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Join McBrayer on a historical journey that uncovers the fascinating story of one of the world's rarest plants, beginning in a hidden glen and extending to modern research. From 19th Century discovery to present-day conservation efforts, you'll learn about the continuing work being done to perpetuate this species' survival.
  • 3 - 3:50 p.m. - Bees, Native Plants and History - Sallie Lee, Urban Region Agent, Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Historically, bees (both native and non-native) have been responsible for providing food and a natural sweetener for our tables. Now, most bee populations are in decline. This presentation will address activities that have upset the delicate natural balance of plant and pollinator, how can we look back to find answers and what can we do to improve future outcomes.

_____________________________

  • 4 - 4:50 p.m. - SoutheasternFlora.com: A Practical Resource for Native Plant Identification - John Gwaltney, CEO, Forestry Suppliers, Inc. Southeastern Flora is an online resource to assist users in identifying native or naturalized wildflowers commonly found in the southeast. Currently there are nearly 1,600 species listed on this site and over 30,000 pictures to facilitate easy identification without knowing how to interpret a plant identification key.
  • 4 - 4:50 p.m. - Good Things From the South - Fred Spicer, Executive Director, Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Many gardeners use the term "native" broadly. Northern gardens would be much less diverse and beautiful if designers didn't embrace southeastern native plants as their own. In this presentation, you'll see and learn more about the southern origins of numerous species (and cultivars) of trees and shrubs whose nativity is misunderstood.
  • 4 - 4:50 p.m. - Ethnobotany: Plants, People, Purpose - Drew Monthie, Adjunct Professor, Ecology and Ethnobotany, SUNY Empire State College. This presentation explores a cross-section of the development of plant use from Old World cutures to the amazing diaspora of plants that accompanied the European colonization of the globe. Colonization led to an amazing exchange of ethnobotanical knowledge between diverse groups of indigenous and transplanted cultures. This exchange was immediate and has influenced modern cultures since.

 

 

_____________________________

Day One Field Trips:

Meeting Locations Will Be Posted at Conference

Day Two Field Trips:

Meeting Locations Will Be Posted at Conference

  • 1 - 5 p.m. - Never Enough Natives: An In-Depth Look at the Native Plant Collections of Birmingham Botanical Gardens - John Manion, Kaul Wildflower Garden Curator, Birmingham Botanical Gardens. The Kaul Wildflower Garden, Barber Alabama Woodlands and Bog Garden house Birmingham Botanical Gardens' extensive native plant collections. Each has its own character and will be visited to see an excellent representation of how Alabama's native flora changes with the approach of autumn. An easy hike, limited to 25.
  • 1 - 5 p.m. - Ruffner Mountain Nature Preserve: A Birmingham Treasure - Henry Hughes, Director of Education, Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Long inactive, the limestone quarry in this large preserve is home to a fascinating ecosystem of plants that thrive on alkaline soils. The walk leading to the quarry is along a ridge dividing two major watersheds, the Black Warrior and Cahaba Rivers. Many colorful and distinctive native plants will be seen in flower and fall color. A moderate hike, limited to 25.

 

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  • 1 - 5 p.m. - Hoover's Hidden Gem: Moss Rock Preserve - Arnie Rutkis, Principal, Stoneshovel Landscape. From lichen covered sandstone and boulder fields, to lush wooded hills and cascading waterfalls, this area has an abundance of unusual and rare plants for participants to observe. Surprising to many is the diversity of habitat and flora so close to home. A moderate hike, limited to 25.
  • 1 - 5 p.m. - Bibb County Glades: A Botanical Wonder - Tom Diggs, Ph.D., Department of Biology, University of Alabama. These limestone glades are an unusual and diverse habitat, with eight new species and many other rare plants to be seen. Participants will explore several sites and observe many distinctive plants (some of them endemic) and their adaptations to this harsh, yet surprisingly beautiful, environment. A moderate hike, limited to 25.
  • 1 - 5 p.m. - Longleaf Pine Restoration at Oak Mountain State Park - Scot Duncan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology, Birmingham-Southern College and Chuck Byrd, Land Steward, The Nature Conservancy, Alabama Chapter. This trip visits areas where the most biodiverse forest type in North America is being restored. Duncan and Byrd will explain the basics of longleaf ecology, point out the symptoms of unhealthy ecosystems and explain the challenges and successful strategies for restoration. Participants will explore woodlands recently thinned with a controlled burn, as well as an area where broadlead trees will be removed. An easy hike, limited to 25.
ADJOURN FOR DINNER ON YOUR OWN
 
  • 6 - 7:30 p.m. - An Evening with William Bartram - John Hall, Ph.D., Curator of the Black Belt Museum, University of West Alabama Invoking the spirit of the early plant explorer William Bartram, Hall offers and introduction, a show of specimens that Bartram collected and a discussion of his 1775 visit to Alabama, including readings from his popular book, "Travels." "Mr. Bartram" then departs and Hall answers questions about the famous botanist. [This event will take place at Birmingham Zoo Auditorium and will include a meet and greet with conference speakers, books sales and signings, beverages and snacks.]